Caring For Your Diesel Car

Diesel Car - Dailycarblog

When you invest in a car, any car, it’s important to know how to take care of it. Being able to look after your car will make sure it lasts longer and will require fewer repairs over the yearsBut different cars require different care, and this is something you can learn the hard way – especially if you’ve only ever dealt with one type of car in the past. Whether you’ve always had diesel engines or this is your first one, there is advice you can follow to keep things running smoothly and to get the most out of your car. Give your engine the best care with the following advice for looking after your diesel car.


Keep it clean

One of the most effective ways of cleaning your diesel engine is simply to keep it clean. When parts become affected by dirt and grime, they can become affected by corrosion and stop working altogether. Use this YouTube video to help guide you through it.

If you’re ever in doubt about the state of your engine, speak to a professional. You should always use appropriate cleaning materials, so be sure to do your research before applying any product.

Use quality fuel

A diesel car’s fuel injectors are tricky customers. They require proper care to avoid damage, and that includes using quality fuel. Firstly, you need to ensure you’re using the right fuel as making the mistake of using unleaded will cause a serious issue! Next, make sure you use high-quality fuel.

Opting for the cheapest might save you money, but you’ll have to fork out in the long-term to replace your injectors and keep your car running effectively. If you’ve bought your car second-hand, ask the previous owners about their fuel choices to give you a clearer idea of what your car needs.

Replace filters regularly

Oil and air filters can become clogged quickly and easily, especially if you take your car through a lot of muddy roads. By replacing the filters, you can avoid common engine issues. Changing your diesel air and fuel filters is easy enough to do yourself, and could save you money compared to doing it as part of your regular service. You could also consider washing the filters as a way to keep them going for longer. 

Source diesel-appropriate parts and spares

used car parts

When your car needs maintenance, it’s easy to try to scrimp and cut corners to find the best deal. While finding a bargain is great, you need to make sure that any parts and spares you buy are from reputable retailers and are high-quality, a diesel specialist can certainly help with this. Choose diesel engine spares from a trusted store and make sure you know what you’re doing. It’s always worth having some spare parts to hand in case of an emergency repair.

Take care in winter

Older diesel cars can be prone to issues in winter, with engines failing to start in colder temperatures. Repairs for diesel cars at this time of year could cost you around £200, a sum better spent on other things! Winter is a good time to get your car serviced, as it could help eliminate problems such as blocked filters. You’ll want to make sure that your tire pressure, heating and other features are all in working order – nobody wants to be stranded on the road in the middle of winter!

Remember to change oil

Changing the oil is another important part of diesel engine maintenance. Don’t just wait for the oil light to come on, consider doing this at least every 5,000 miles. You might need to do this more frequently if your vehicle has heavy use and is used to carry heavy equipment or for towing. Keeping a supply of appropriate motor oil to hand will make this easy for you to do as needed.

Oil Change Girl dailycarblog.com

There are a lot of reasons to choose a diesel car. Diesel engines are more efficient, and you could save on your fuel bill too. As with any car, it’s important to understand its maintenance needs and how to carry out basic checks and replacements. With the right care, your diesel car will last you a long time and prove to be a reliable vehicle, whatever you use it for.

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