Thinking About Buying A Lovely New Land Rover Discovery Sport? We Suggest You Think Again

Land Rover Discovery Sport, real reviews, - - dailycarblog.com

The Land Rover Discovery Sport, proper Briitish it is, proper British. First launched in 2014 it was basically a rehashed Ford Mondeo in Land Rover apparel. The second-generation launched this year and is actually based on the Range Rover Evoque’s chassis. Modularity is the name of the game in modern automotive production. The new Discovery Sport looks pretty much similar to the first generation, indeed it’s just an existing product refresh. But the interior is boosted with the latest JLR – we refer to them as PTSD – infotainment system and driver assistant technologies.

Much of the British motoring press have given the Discovery Sport a positive thumbs up. Autocar, Topgear, Auto Express give the thumbs up Carwow, Car magazine not so convinced. But you can be sure that a vast majority of the British motoring press will give the Discovery Sport glowing reviews because they are British and they are heavily biased towards Land Rover. It is in their personal and corporate interests for Land Rover to succeed.


One shouldn’t be so surprised, regional journalists are the worst, they will give a thumbs up to any shitty car. These motoring journalists typically suffer from the “Stockholm Syndrome”, that’s when a hostage identifies or empathizes with a captor. And they are hostages to Land Rover, fearing the loss of access and no more free booze.

But – for specific reasons – we here at DCB HQ operate outside the hostage situation that is Land Rover PR. And as a result, we are better able to give you an unbiased opinion as to why you should not buy a Land Rover Discovery Sport. Look past the positivity, the high-fives, the back scratching and the four-star reviews and what you have is a typical, lousy Land Rover product.

So we decided to see if the Discovery Sport was as good as it’s made out to be and conducted our own investigative journalism. That’s when we hit trouble, we actually didn’t have a budget to conduct any journalism at all. We’ve only got £50 left in the kitty and that’s for the Christmas party fund. I lied, we’re secretly giving it to Oxfam, I do apologise for the offense caused.

Anyway, we stumbled upon the Carbuyer.co.uk owner review section for the Discovery Sport. If you want to know how bad the Discovery Sport really is as opposed to the motoring press reviews it is has been captured by Carbuyer for all to see. We can’t understand why Carbuyer still enjoys a positive working relationship with their hostage-takers.

One can only assume Carbuyer’s reach, ABC, demographics is an important tool for Land Rover to make sure everyone knows just how shitty it is to own a Land Rover for real. Below are a few owner reviews, to read more head on over to carbuyer.co.uk.


Real Land Rover Owner Reviews (source Carbuyer.co.uk)

Bill Carney from Isle Of Axholme (rating: 1 star out of 5)

I bought a new Land Rover Discovery Sport it had 15 miles on the clock. After only 2,800 miles the engine failed on the M1 motor way, it was and dark, raining hard. The In-car “Land Rover Road Side Support Call System” did not work, I had to get off the Motorway and find accommodation for the night, not easy with two bulldogs in the boot. The car was undrivable, the Land Rover support engineer came next morning and said the bottom of the engine had failed do not even start the engine again. He called the AA to take vehicle to a dealer. The dealer in Southampton (240 miles from home) would not, or could not, supply a replacement vehicle. Despite me being sent there by Land Rover Customer Service and assured a vehicle would be ready for me. The AA then took me, the car and the two bulldogs to Salisbury, where eventually after a series of irate phone calls by the AA man, did supply another vehicle. Altogether from the car failing this took one and a half days. I don’t know what I would have done without the support of the AA man, he said they rescue more Discovery Sports than he cares to remember. He also said that the car would be with Landover for at least six weeks. It was in fact there for seven weeks. The vehicle they supplied was a top of the range Discovery with 2,000 miles on the clock, I set out for home, the weather was still very bad, when I got onto the MI the cars computer told me the tyre pressures were wrong, and the windscreen washers had no fluid. The new Discovery gearbox developed a fault in the first week on the M18 motorway and I had to call out the Land Rover Support again who came out and who said it was a software fault and had to download and install up to date soft ware (few weeks old car). They did repair it there. I did get my car back after seven+ weeks it had apparently had a new engine fuel injectors and Turbo. Though no one would tell me officially what had been wrong or what repairs or replacements had been done. There was no paperwork. The vehicle was also very dirty. Throughout the whole sad scenario Land Rover were very unhelpful just reminding me that my contract was with the dealer not them, the dealer was saying throughout that they had to wait for support from Land Rover In the end after some argument with the original dealers they bought the car back from me, though I did lose several thousand pounds. I don’t wish to make it appear that everyone was difficult, in the two dealerships and Land Rover Customer Services there were people who were sympathetic and tried to be helpful, Several members of Land Rover and dealership staff all tried to be reasonably caring and deal with the matter, but I felt they were limited by their own organisations in what they could do. I do miss having a Land Rover Discovery but after the dreadful experience I could not have had the vehicle back, or even another Land Rover with the same engine and unless you are prepared to fork out almost £20K more, that’s the only engine available.Problems Engine.


EAMON RICE from Northern Ireland (rating: 1 star out of 5)

This vehicle is one of the worst cars I have owned, after each service it has to go back to the dealer Charles Hurst Belfast again to get the service lights turned off. Now Land Rover customer services say that my 30 travel to work each way at an average of 70 mph is not enough to rejuvenate the Diesel particulate filter (DPF). This is not what I expected from Land Rover. Their customer services say at this it needs servicing every 4000 miles but this is not what I bought this car for. “Thank you for contacting the Jaguar Land Rover Customer Experience Centre. Below is customer services response anyone any wit stay away from this product Further to our telephone conversation I can confirm the data extracted from your vehicle has been analysed and my technical team have deemed the drive cycle with your vehicle is poor thus resulting in early oil and filters charges being required. Cleaning of the exhaust filter, also known as regeneration, occurs automatically between approximately every 186 to 559 miles (300 to 900 km) depending on driving conditions, and requires the engine to reach normal operating temperature. This self-cleaning takes place when the vehicle is driven steadily at speeds between 40 mph to 70 mph (60 km/h to 112 km/h). This process normally takes 10-20 minutes. It is possible for self-cleaning to occur at lower vehicle speeds, but the process may take a little longer at a 30 mph (50 km/h) average speed. Oil Dilution occurs over time due to normal oil degradation as well as by failed Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration where the unburnt diesel that is used to perform a regeneration running down the piston bores into the engine sump.This does not occur if the DPF is allowed to complete a full regeneration without interruption, but a high number of incomplete DPF regenerations will cause a large amount of diesel to mix with the engine oil – leading to a higher than normal oil dilution, necessitating an engine oil and filter change. DPF regeneration works by injecting additional diesel into the combustion chamber (post combustion) on the exhaust stroke so that it is used to burn off the build up of soot in the DPF. When the level of soot reduces to ‘normal’, the injection of diesel stops. If the DPF regen cycle is interrupted (frequent short journeys), any unburnt diesel will run into the sump, diluting the oil. As a manufacturer, our obligation remains to ensure your vehicle is operating correctly and to address any manufacturing or material defects. It has been deemed there is no manufacturing concern with your vehicle. Any discussions around the contract of sale or any discussions that took place during the initial sale would need to be discussed directly with the selling retailer as I am regrettably unable to comment on this. I understand you continue to remain dissatisfied with the response, however this remains our final position and I am unable to assist further regarding this matter. Should you still remain dissatisfied, at this point I would suggest that you seek third party advice. Please be assured that should we receive any contact from a nominated third party, we will respond accordingly. As advised, this has been fully reviewed and does remain the final response of Jaguar Land Rover.”


Click on this link to read more Land Rover Discovery Sport reviews from real owners


Leave a comment

Sign-in to dailycarblog.com

Register | Lost your password?